Friday, April 1, 2011

I stop for pretty buildings

London was incredible. So much fun, such an amazing place, I am determined to go back again and again. I love getting lost in that city, with every turn you take, one ends up on a little alley with a great pub or fabulous boutiques or in a lovely park. Their city planners were brilliant.

The best part for me was to observe the integration of modern architecture with historical classics. Yes, the two can live harmoniously in one city and look perfectly paired. The incredible detail of the historic buildings blows my mind (especially when I think about drawing that out) and contrasted against some more internationally modern architecture just makes me smile. It's not a revolutionary idea and I know I am not the first to notice this concept, but it really is one of the things I loved the most.

Here are some examples of what I loved in London. There were really too many fabulous buildings for me to attempt to document where any of these are but I do remember a few.



Hotel Russel (around the corner from the British Museum.)



Interesting building (near SOAS campus)



I just loved the shape of the windows.



Liberty of London = Fabulous = it's own post at a later date.






The British Museum



The view looking towards Central London while crossing The Millennium Bridge.



Royal Courts of Justice-breathtaking building, don't mind me in the photo.





Loved these buildings along Greek Street, they each have their own personality.



These condos were right around the corner from my hotel, they were a series of buildings and all different colors (there was a green one too but he didn't fit in the photo.)



What building isn't made better by a giant, glittering stiletto? Priscella aside, the Palace Theater is really beautiful.

2 comments:

The Devoted Classicist said...

A great assortment of London buildings! Prince Charles has been working hard to make new buildings fit better with the old.

Yummy Scrumptious said...

I really adore the combination and how seamlessly new and old buildings fit together.